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Lectio and Visio Divina

Lectio Divina John 1:1-15 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.2 He was in the beginning with God. 3 All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being 4 in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. 5 The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it. 6 There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. 7 He came as a witness to testify to the light, so that all might believe through him. 8 He himself was not the light, but he came to testify to the light. 9 The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world.10 He...

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SOLD - "Simply Jesus"

  24 x 24 oil on 1.5 inch thick gallery wrap canvas While reading N.T. Wright's book, "Simply Jesus" I have been inspired to paint just that, simply Jesus. This is an original oil painting that will be a one of a kind with no prints made.  It is signed with the artist's name and "sDg" which stands for the latin phrase "soli Deo gloria" or "to God alone be the glory."   

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Elijah's Football Portrait: The Process

Here is Elijah's football portrait after 4 days of work.  I still have a few details to add once it's dry enough to touch up and sign, but for the most part its finished. Here is how it progressed from the underpainting. If you're not used to seeing a work in progress (WIP) then this stage of painting may look bizarre to you. I start with the darkest shadow tones of the skin, then the middle or half-tones and finally the lightest skin tones.  I blend with a mongoose brush and then begin adding the details of the face to capture the likeness.  I must say I agree with John Singer Sargent's famous words, "A portrait is a painting with...

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Day 2: An Athlete's Football Portrait

I was up early again this morning and was able to complete the underpainting on Elijah’s football portrait. Underpainting is a low-key version of the final painting. This method of using a brown or gray monochrome underpainting is also called a grisalle, which was used by the Renaissance artists. It may seem odd to do an underpainting that I’m going to paint over, why not start with full color? You can think of it as a blueprint of the final version of the painting and it serves several purposes: 1. It fixes the main compositional elements.2. It serves as a tonal guide to the subsequent application of color.3. It allows me to paint with thin paint, particularly in the shadows...

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